Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

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Apocrypha/Ascetica/Magica/Manichaica at Heidelberg

The Heidelberger Papyrussammlung has made a number of color photos (in both 72 and 150 DPI) of very important Coptic papyri available on their website, including: the Acta Pauli, ed. Carl Schmidt (Hildesheim, 1905; P. Heid. Inv. Kopt. 300-301), important as a witness to both the text and the Lycopolitan dialect; selections of P. Nepheros, ed. Bärbel Kramer and John Shelton (Mainz, 1987; mostly Greek papyri), an important fourth-century monastic archive from the Heracleopolite nome; Continue reading

Photoshop Manual for Scholars

This site is part of the West Semitic Research Project at the University of Southern California, founded by Bruce and Kenneth Zuckerman, who are famous for their photography of ancient manuscripts, including the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Coptic Manichaean codices from Medinet Madi.  They have provided some basic guidance for scholars using Adobe Photoshop to work with digital images of ancient texts; Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DMNT)

This site is a database of published documents (currently comprising 733 texts) from Medieval Nubia that use any form of chronological system; it is administered at the University of Warsaw by Grzegorz Ochała, who used this data in his recently published book Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia (Warsaw, 2011).  The texts are in the three primary written languages of medieval Nubia: Greek, Coptic, and Old Nubian. Continue reading