Library of Late Antique Latin Texts: Biblioteca digitale di testi latini tardoantichi (digilibLT)

This extraordinary resource, headed by Raffaella Tabacco and Maurizio Lana of the Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, seeks to make available all literary Latin texts from Late Antiquity (ranging from the second to seventh centuries CE); as well as to establish a Canon of authors and acephalous works, with short descriptions and associated bibliography.  One can browse by date or name of author and work, and download the Latin text (all taken from critical editions) in either .txt format or marked up in TEI XML.  A relatively small percentage of the Canon is currently available, but there are regular updates, with an initial focus on pagan prose authors. Continue reading

Last Statues of Antiquity Database

This recently activated site is described as “a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.”  The project is directed by R.R.R. Smith and Bryan Ward-Perkins at Oxford University, where the site is hosted; the database was produced by a large international team of contributors, with funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council. Continue reading

Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

The Egeria Project

This interesting site is sponsored by a variety of civic and religious institutions, as well as cultural agencies; the full name of the project is Egeria: Mediterranean Medieval Places of Pilgrimage.  According to the site, the goal of the project is “the establishment of a network of cooperation for the documentation, preservation, enhancement and promotion of pilgrimage monuments.” Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Patrologia Latina Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Latina; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading

Bibliography on the History of Monasticism in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

This is a growing bibliography (5,768 entries as of May 2012), of fundamental importance to the field.  Although it is not yet comprehensive, it is distinguished by its scope: Greek, Latin, Syriac, and Coptic monasticism are all covered; and early medieval monasticism, the study of which is usually inexplicably separate from its Late Antique past, is equally well represented, at any rate for the Latin West. Continue reading