TITUS/ARMAZI: Biblical, Apocryphal, and Patristic Texts in Old Georgian

The TITUS site, which is otherwise dedicated mostly to electronic Texts in Indo-European languages, also contains a very large group of texts in Old Georgian; most of these were entered in the framework of the Armazi project for the electronic documentation of Caucasian languages and cultures, an early internet endeavor conducted between 1999 and 2002.  Electronic texts include the complete Old and New Testaments, with entries for specific manuscripts and lectionaries; important apocryphal texts, such as the Story of Joseph of Arimathea on the first church in Lydda (for which see my article in Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 50); Continue reading

TITUS: Biblical and Patristic Texts in Grabar (Classical Armenian)

This is the first of several entries on TITUS, the Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien, a joint project of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt; the Charles University in Prague; the University of Copenhagen; and the University of Oviedo.  This site, which in some ways might be seen as a complement to Perseus, contains an extraordinary amount of e-Texts, mostly in Indo-European languages, both ancient and modern; these are usually available in both HTML and WordCruncher. Continue reading

A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

This bibliographic database, compiled and hosted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity, covers scholarship in multiple languages from the 17th-century to 2012.  One can conveniently browse or search the database by author, year, era, or keyword (reflecting the generous tagging of each individual entry for content). Continue reading

Sasanika

An important and steadily expanding centralized information portal for all aspects of the history and culture of the Sasanian Empire, hosted at the University of California-Irvine, under the direction of Touraj Daryaee.  Some highlights of the site are the open-access series “e-sasanika,” including bibliographical studies, topical surveys, and catalogues of material culture; various primary sources in English translation; a working bibliography of Sasanian studies in the form of a searchable pdf; Continue reading