Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus: Text and Translation

Dr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B., of Saint Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo California, has made available online the text and translation of a number of important works by the fourth-century monastic theorist Evagrius Ponticus.  His site is noteworthy for providing translations of texts that are not available in English anywhere in print, most notably the Kephalaia Gnostica, a highly influential text for monastic spirituality, extant in Syriac, but not the original Greek. Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DMNT)

This site is a database of published documents (currently comprising 733 texts) from Medieval Nubia that use any form of chronological system; it is administered at the University of Warsaw by Grzegorz Ochała, who used this data in his recently published book Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia (Warsaw, 2011).  The texts are in the three primary written languages of medieval Nubia: Greek, Coptic, and Old Nubian. Continue reading

Patrologia Graeca Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Graeca; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading