Last Statues of Antiquity Database

This recently activated site is described as “a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.”  The project is directed by R.R.R. Smith and Bryan Ward-Perkins at Oxford University, where the site is hosted; the database was produced by a large international team of contributors, with funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council. Continue reading

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Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading