The Age of Spirituality: Late Antique and Early Christian Art

Age_of_Spirituality_Late_Antique_and_Early_Christian_Art_Third_to_Seventh_Century

1977 was not only the year of Star Wars, it also heralded the Age of Spirituality!  As a follow up to the recent post on Byzantium and Islam, a special exhibit from 2012 with a permanent web presence, I note here that the Metropolitan Museum of Art has made available for download a true monument of scholarship on early Christianity and Late Antiquity, produced in conjunction with one of the most important special exhibits ever (“hailed as one of the most important didactic exhibitions ever assembled by an art museum”), The Age of Spirituality: Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century (Nov. 19, 1977-Feb. 12 1978). Continue reading

Late Antique Inscriptions from Aphrodisias

Aphrodisias, a major site in Turkey where NYU has undertaken substantial excavations since 1961, now also has extensive online documentation for the period of Late Antiquity.  In 2004, Charlotte Roueché published the website “Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity,” an early example of the growing number of internet corpora of Greek and Latin inscriptions; this indeed represented a new stage in digital epigraphy, as it was the (exclusively online) second edition of her print book, Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity: The Late Roman and Byzantine Inscriptions (SPRS, 1989).  While still available on the web, this site has been superseded by “Inscriptions of Aphrodisias” since 2007, an edition of all inscriptions discovered between 1961 and 1994, including a substantial number which were previously unpublished. Continue reading

Digital Roman Forum in Late Antiquity

This ground-breaking project, undertaken between 1997 and 2005 at the UCLA Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory, under the direction of Bernard Frischer and Diane Favro, still remains the most important visual reference for the Roman Forum, a useful archive of literary and iconographic sources, and a standard for online visualization projects of ancient sites.  The Digital Roman Forum project aims to reconstruct the appearance of the Forum in Late Antiquity (400 CE), on a building-by-building basis.  The reconstruction of each monument is presented as a series of still images from various perspectives, as well as Panorma and Object movies; bibliographic information is included as well. Continue reading

Virtual Reconstruction of Late Antique and Medieval Constantinople (Byzantium 1200)

This site offers a set of 3-d reconstructions with a CAD program of the major monuments of Constantantinople, as they appeared around 1200 (a few years before the city was sacked during the Fourth Crusade).  According to its introduction, Byzantium 1200 is the creation of an independent researcher (for whom no name is given), in collaboration with Albrecht Berger, then of the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Istanbul, now Professor of Byzantine Studies at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich.

Each building was reconstructed using a combination of earlier sketches, ancient and medieval reports, and, in some cases, original on-site surveying in Constantinople. Continue reading

Neoplatonic Bibliographies: Proclus and Damascius

This site, administered by Gerd van Riel at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, is an evolving bibliography, last updated in 2012.  Two separate pages are devoted to the major late Neoplatonists, Proclus and Damascius. Continue reading

Bibliography on the Roman Imperial Cult

This site, administered by John Paul Adams of Cal State-Northridge, is a bibliography of the Roman Imperial Cult, last updated in May 2004.  It is arranged by subject matter: General; Cult Features; Priests and Officials; Individual Emperors; The City of Rome; Army; and The Provinces. Continue reading

A Hellenistic Bibliography (Eudocia, Nonnus, Orphica, et alia)

This site is compiled and maintained by Martine Cuypers at Trinity College Dublin, with the support of the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek initially and now of the School of Histories and Humanities at TCD.  It is an evolving bibliography (last updated in August 2011), organized into 6 major categories, including Hellenistic Poets, Epigrammatists, and Imperial Greek Poets.  The latter features a number of Late-Antique authors, including Eudocia, Nonnus, and the Orphic Poems, Continue reading

Last Statues of Antiquity Database

This recently activated site is described as “a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.”  The project is directed by R.R.R. Smith and Bryan Ward-Perkins at Oxford University, where the site is hosted; the database was produced by a large international team of contributors, with funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council. Continue reading

Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading