Digital Manuscripts at the Walters Art Museum

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, like many institutions with important manuscripts, is digitizing their collection; a Preservation and Access grant from the NEH is supporting the creation of images for their Byzantine, Armenian, and Ethiopian holdings.  The Walters Art Museum’s approach, however, is multi-faceted: one can flip through “digital surrogates” of select manuscripts, especially in the Islamic collection, including this copy of the Shahname; or download digital images of others, such as this Syriac Galen, on a different site.  Most innovative, perhaps, is their creation of a Flickr stream with images from their archiving project, which may indeed be an effective way to have these manuscripts reach a broader audience. Continue reading

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Hmmlorientalia by Adam McCollum

This rich blog by Adam McCollum features posts connected to his work as lead cataloguer of Eastern Christian Manuscripts at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library at St. John’s University, Minnesota.  There are a number of interesting entries about manuscripts which he has examined, including observations about the field of Eastern Christian studies more generally (especially Armenian, Arabic, Ethiopic, and Syriac), which is literally centuries behind Classics with respect to cataloguing and editing. Continue reading

Patrologia Orientalis

This page, part of Roger Pearse’s Tertullian.org site, lists Brepols’ venerable Patrologia Orientalis series by volume, including the contents of each, which usually include diverse texts in more than one language (Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ge’ez, Georgian, Old Slavonic, and Syriac). When a volume exists on Google Books or the Internet Archive, a link is provided; the last available book is volume 25 (1946). Continue reading

Encyclopaedia Aethiopica

This site is associated with the Encyclopaedia Aethiopica, a massive reference work of Ethiopian history from the pre-Christian to the modern periods, of which four (of five) volumes have already been published.  Although the site contains no research tools as such, there are useful items such as a list of articles in the EAE, and, most notably, a bibliography of standard monographs, travel narratives, reference works, and journals on the history, culture, and languages of Ethiopia.

http://www1.uni-hamburg.de/EAE/

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

The Hill Museum and Manuscript Library (HMML) at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota is building an archive of reproductions of Eastern Christian manuscripts, especially those in danger of damage or destruction, under the direction of Professor Columba Stewart.  According to the website, there are now over 125,000 manuscripts on microfilm or digitized. Continue reading

Thesaurus Linguae Aethiopicae

This site, run by Manfred Kropp of the University of Mainz, contains resources on computing and Ethiopian languages, in particular Ge’ez and Amharic.  Resources include documents on transliteration standards; unfortunately, the link to fonts is broken.  The ultimate goal of the project is to create an electronic database of texts in Ethiopian languages, including the Axumite inscriptions, of particular interest for Late Antique religions. Continue reading