Red Monastery Video at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

From March 14-July 8, 2012, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is hosting a special exhibition, “Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition.”  The exhibition has a strong online presence, including an extraordinary video of the Red Monastery, one of the best-preserved examples of Late Antique church architecture, especially noted for its vibrantly colored paintings. Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus: Text and Translation

Dr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B., of Saint Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo California, has made available online the text and translation of a number of important works by the fourth-century monastic theorist Evagrius Ponticus.  His site is noteworthy for providing translations of texts that are not available in English anywhere in print, most notably the Kephalaia Gnostica, a highly influential text for monastic spirituality, extant in Syriac, but not the original Greek. Continue reading

The Egeria Project

This interesting site is sponsored by a variety of civic and religious institutions, as well as cultural agencies; the full name of the project is Egeria: Mediterranean Medieval Places of Pilgrimage.  According to the site, the goal of the project is “the establishment of a network of cooperation for the documentation, preservation, enhancement and promotion of pilgrimage monuments.” Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Nag Hammadi Archive

This important collection of photos documents the editing of the Nag Hammadi Library and related activities, in Egypt, during the mid-70s.  They include photographs of the editors working at the Coptic Museum in Cairo; from the archaeological work done around the spot of the find; and finally, a series of negatives of the manuscripts themselves, taken in 1973, distinct from the facsimile edition of the codices later published by Brill. Continue reading

Coptic Churches and Monasteries

One of a growing number of websites geared towards tourism but presenting useful overviews for students of religion in Late Antiquity.  It includes a reasonably accurate description of numerous historic Coptic churches, organized by region, with photographs, historical notes, and, occasionally, floor plans.  There is also a section on the Christian monasteries of Egypt.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/coptchurch.htm

Index of Armenian Art

A very important resource for Armenian art, maintained by the Armenian Studies program at California State University Fresno, including an index of Armenian architecture (mostly ecclesiastical), and an index of illuminations in medieval Armenian manuscripts.  The first index features a list of churches by architectural type, for each of which there is an extensive description, usually including a floor plan, picture, and sometimes even a video.  Major Late Antique foundations such as Etchmiadzin figure prominently. Continue reading

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

The Hill Museum and Manuscript Library (HMML) at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota is building an archive of reproductions of Eastern Christian manuscripts, especially those in danger of damage or destruction, under the direction of Professor Columba Stewart.  According to the website, there are now over 125,000 manuscripts on microfilm or digitized. Continue reading