Byzantium and Islam: A Special/Web Exhibit at the Met

Museums large and small are not only digitizing their inventories; many now also create permanent websites for special exhibitions.  An excellent example of the latter is “Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition,” at the Met between March 14 and July 8 2012, one of the best presentations of the material culture of later Late Antiquity, which brought the now widespread academic trend of viewing early Islam within its historical context to a wider audience; Continue reading

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A Blog on Medieval Nubia: The Medieval Sai Project

This blog, run by the Nubiologists Alexandros Tsakos and Henriette Hafsaas-Tsakos, contains a number of interesting reflections on the medieval Nubian kingdoms, as well as their archaeological work, which is affiliated with the Sai Island Archaeological Mission at the Université Charles-de-Gaulle in Lille.  Their thoughtful posts address major questions of methodology and interpretation in Nubian studies, including the state of the sources, whether in Western museums or endangered sites in modern Sudan.  Both philological and archaeological topics are covered.  The blogs from the field offer a fascinating, vivid portrait of the region.

http://medievalsaiproject.wordpress.com/about/

Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

e-COPTOLOGY: Towards a Digital Heritage

This blog, recently launched by Ibrahim Saweros of Leiden University, provides a series of links to works in Coptic studies of the most varied character.  For the most part, they are scanned by the author, and made available for download from mediafire.com.  Saweros focuses on texts absent from the sites of Pierre Cherix and Alin Suciu, to which it is an important complement. Continue reading

Apocrypha/Ascetica/Magica/Manichaica at Heidelberg

The Heidelberger Papyrussammlung has made a number of color photos (in both 72 and 150 DPI) of very important Coptic papyri available on their website, including: the Acta Pauli, ed. Carl Schmidt (Hildesheim, 1905; P. Heid. Inv. Kopt. 300-301), important as a witness to both the text and the Lycopolitan dialect; selections of P. Nepheros, ed. Bärbel Kramer and John Shelton (Mainz, 1987; mostly Greek papyri), an important fourth-century monastic archive from the Heracleopolite nome; Continue reading

Patrologia Orientalis

This page, part of Roger Pearse’s Tertullian.org site, lists Brepols’ venerable Patrologia Orientalis series by volume, including the contents of each, which usually include diverse texts in more than one language (Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ge’ez, Georgian, Old Slavonic, and Syriac). When a volume exists on Google Books or the Internet Archive, a link is provided; the last available book is volume 25 (1946). Continue reading

Red Monastery Video at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

From March 14-July 8, 2012, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is hosting a special exhibition, “Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition.”  The exhibition has a strong online presence, including an extraordinary video of the Red Monastery, one of the best-preserved examples of Late Antique church architecture, especially noted for its vibrantly colored paintings. Continue reading