A Blog on Medieval Nubia: The Medieval Sai Project

This blog, run by the Nubiologists Alexandros Tsakos and Henriette Hafsaas-Tsakos, contains a number of interesting reflections on the medieval Nubian kingdoms, as well as their archaeological work, which is affiliated with the Sai Island Archaeological Mission at the Université Charles-de-Gaulle in Lille.  Their thoughtful posts address major questions of methodology and interpretation in Nubian studies, including the state of the sources, whether in Western museums or endangered sites in modern Sudan.  Both philological and archaeological topics are covered.  The blogs from the field offer a fascinating, vivid portrait of the region.

http://medievalsaiproject.wordpress.com/about/

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Apocryphicity by Tony Burke

This important blog on Christian apocrypha was established about six years ago by Tony Burke of York University.  The author posts updates and commentary on recent scholarship about apocryphal literature, as reflected in publications, conferences, and on the web.  Burke, along with Brent Laundau of the University of Oklahoma, is co-editing the two-volume More Christian Apocrypha (forthcoming with Eerdmans, beginning 2013); his site also contains a useful breakdown of many apocryphal texts that will appear in this work, almost all of them highly interesting, but with no English translation and limited bibliography, which is duly provided.

http://www.tonyburke.ca/apocryphicity/

e-COPTOLOGY: Towards a Digital Heritage

This blog, recently launched by Ibrahim Saweros of Leiden University, provides a series of links to works in Coptic studies of the most varied character.  For the most part, they are scanned by the author, and made available for download from mediafire.com.  Saweros focuses on texts absent from the sites of Pierre Cherix and Alin Suciu, to which it is an important complement. Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Aramaico

A Portuguese language blog on Aramaic language and culture; includes a series of well-organized links to Syriac texts, which are arranged both according to ancient authors and modern series, namely CSCO  Scriptores Syri and Patrologia Orientalis, from either Google Books or the Internet Archive. Continue reading

Sasanika

An important and steadily expanding centralized information portal for all aspects of the history and culture of the Sasanian Empire, hosted at the University of California-Irvine, under the direction of Touraj Daryaee.  Some highlights of the site are the open-access series “e-sasanika,” including bibliographical studies, topical surveys, and catalogues of material culture; various primary sources in English translation; a working bibliography of Sasanian studies in the form of a searchable pdf; Continue reading