Islamic Stories and Tombs of Biblical Prophets

The personal website of Brannon Wheeler includes a number of interesting resources for early and medieval Islam.  There is a collection of pages on the biblical prophets, with a resume of Islamic traditions concerning them, abridged from his study of the Qisas al-anbiya, Prophets in the Quran: An Introduction to the Quran and Muslim Exegesis (Continuum, 2002).  Manuscript illuminations are provided for each prophet, though they are not cited – my guess is that they are Persian and Ottoman.  An additional section contains pages on the tombs and shrines of prophets, accompanied by photographs of the contemporary site.  There is a growing field (though one with an extended and highly contested pedigree) on interconnections between early Islamic, Jewish, and Christian tradition, as evidenced, for example, by the recently announced Society for Qur’anic Studies, the organization of which is to be coordinated initially by the SBL. Continue reading

Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

TITUS: Biblical and Patristic Texts in Grabar (Classical Armenian)

This is the first of several entries on TITUS, the Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien, a joint project of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt; the Charles University in Prague; the University of Copenhagen; and the University of Oviedo.  This site, which in some ways might be seen as a complement to Perseus, contains an extraordinary amount of e-Texts, mostly in Indo-European languages, both ancient and modern; these are usually available in both HTML and WordCruncher. Continue reading

A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

This bibliographic database, compiled and hosted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity, covers scholarship in multiple languages from the 17th-century to 2012.  One can conveniently browse or search the database by author, year, era, or keyword (reflecting the generous tagging of each individual entry for content). Continue reading

Dukhrana

Dukhrana (Syriac for “remembrance”) is a blog devoted to Syriac studies, especially the Peshitta, administered by Lars Lindgren, and making use of George Kiraz’s Syriac Electronic Data Retrieval Archive (SEDRA).  In addition to digital images of several manuscripts, the entire Peshitta is available as an electronic text, which can be browsed by chapter, with the options of displaying English translations of the Peshitta, as well as Greek and Latin biblical texts, simultaneously. Continue reading

Claremont Coptic Encyclopedia

The Claremont Coptic encyclopedia is an “updated and continuously expanding and evolving web-based version of the Coptic Encyclopedia,” an exemplary multi-volume work published in 1991 (editor: Aziz Atiya), significantly ahead of similar resources in Syriac and Ethiopic Christianity. Continue reading

Digital Images of Codex Bezae

The Codex Bezae is now available online in digitized form, as part of Cambridge Digital Library’s Treasures of the Library collection.  It is possible to browse the manuscript, download an image of each page as a .jpg file with the click of a button, or even directly request publication rights. Continue reading