Christian Arabic on the Web

The growing field of Christian Arabic studies, which has been especially invigorated by the work of Sidney Griffith, especially The Church in the Shadow of the Mosque: Christians and Muslims in the World of Islam (Princeton, 2008), now enjoys an expanding web presence as well.  Given the restricted size of this discipline, The North American Society for Christian Arabic Studies is a professional organization which seems to be based entirely on its website, without membership dues.  Still, it has many of the same benefits as dues-based organizations (there are notices of upcoming conferences and events), as well as additional resources, including a large, member-generated bibliography of recent publications, arranged by year and dating back to 2000. Continue reading

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Hmmlorientalia by Adam McCollum

This rich blog by Adam McCollum features posts connected to his work as lead cataloguer of Eastern Christian Manuscripts at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library at St. John’s University, Minnesota.  There are a number of interesting entries about manuscripts which he has examined, including observations about the field of Eastern Christian studies more generally (especially Armenian, Arabic, Ethiopic, and Syriac), which is literally centuries behind Classics with respect to cataloguing and editing. Continue reading

A Bibliography on Christianity in Palestine/Eretz-Israel

This large bibliographical database covers all periods from the Roman Empire to the present.  Late Antiquity, with the development of the Christian Holy Land, is well represented.  Like the Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity, it is hosted at Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Early Christianity.  The bibliography can be browsed alphabetically by author, year, era (Roman Palestine, Byzantine Palestine, Islamic Period, Crusaders, Mamluk Period, Ottoman Period, and Modernity), or according to a very large number of keywords based on tags for each entry, a feature that offers significant searching power. Continue reading

Islamic Stories and Tombs of Biblical Prophets

The personal website of Brannon Wheeler includes a number of interesting resources for early and medieval Islam.  There is a collection of pages on the biblical prophets, with a resume of Islamic traditions concerning them, abridged from his study of the Qisas al-anbiya, Prophets in the Quran: An Introduction to the Quran and Muslim Exegesis (Continuum, 2002).  Manuscript illuminations are provided for each prophet, though they are not cited – my guess is that they are Persian and Ottoman.  An additional section contains pages on the tombs and shrines of prophets, accompanied by photographs of the contemporary site.  There is a growing field (though one with an extended and highly contested pedigree) on interconnections between early Islamic, Jewish, and Christian tradition, as evidenced, for example, by the recently announced Society for Qur’anic Studies, the organization of which is to be coordinated initially by the SBL. Continue reading

Online Glossarium Graeco-Arabicum

This website represents an extraordinary marriage between the note card – a standard form of data entry before computer-assisted research – and the internet database, in the service of an immense scholarly reference work with has been diligently assembled over several decades but relatively slow to appear in print.  The project in question is the Glossarium Graeco-Arabicum, based at the Ruhr Universität Bochum since 1980, and with the initial collaboration of Yale University. Continue reading

e-COPTOLOGY: Towards a Digital Heritage

This blog, recently launched by Ibrahim Saweros of Leiden University, provides a series of links to works in Coptic studies of the most varied character.  For the most part, they are scanned by the author, and made available for download from mediafire.com.  Saweros focuses on texts absent from the sites of Pierre Cherix and Alin Suciu, to which it is an important complement. Continue reading

Patrologia Orientalis

This page, part of Roger Pearse’s Tertullian.org site, lists Brepols’ venerable Patrologia Orientalis series by volume, including the contents of each, which usually include diverse texts in more than one language (Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ge’ez, Georgian, Old Slavonic, and Syriac). When a volume exists on Google Books or the Internet Archive, a link is provided; the last available book is volume 25 (1946). Continue reading