Job Posting (Late Latin Studies/Digital Humanities, Iowa)

The Department of Classics at The University of Iowa invites applications for a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level in Late Latin Studies (2nd Century CE through 9th Century CE) with a demonstrated interest in digital Humanities, to begin in August 2014. For more information, please see https://jobs.uiowa.edu/faculty/view/63236.

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Bumberazi by Stephen Rapp: Explorations in Medieval Georgia and Caucasia

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This site presents the research of Stephen Rapp, who has done much over the past several decades to present Late Antique and Medieval Georgia to an Anglophone audience.  It contains an important list of links to the Georgian text and/or English translations of key sources, including the Life of Nino and the Conversion of Kartli; links to relevant sites; as well as a gallery of photos taken by the author.  An important resource for an understudied area of Late Antiquity.

http://bumberazi.com/

Kartvelologists (or aspiring ones) may also consult other Old Georgian resources strewn across the web: hmmlorientalia has a great survey of basic grammatical resources, as well as a series of posts on Old Georgian; and a number of Old Georgian writings are available as e-texts on Titus.org.

TM Magic

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The TM Magic Database, administered by Franziska Naether and Mark Depauw, is the newest addition to Trismegistos, a premier information portal for the ancient world, with a focus on Egypt between 800 BC and AD 800.  In its own words, it collects “metadata of somewhat “dubious” nature: all things “religion”, “ritual”, “magic” and “divination” / “mantike”.”  There are currently 3712 entries.  A quick browse through these records suggests that the initial focus is, broadly speaking, “magic” and “divination,” but material such as Isidorus’s hymns to Isis is also present.  Researchers can search in one or more categories: publication, editor, and inventory, as well as language/script (primarily Demotic, Greek, and Coptic), provenance, nome, and type (genre); the results can be viewed in any available Trismegistos-collaborating database.  As more entries are added, the site will become an increasingly powerful tool for researchers in ancient Egyptian magic.

http://www.trismegistos.org/magic/

 

Prêtres Civiques: A Prosopography of Imperial Cult Officials in Roman Asia Minor

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This important site by Gabrielle Frija is something of an online companion to her recent study of the Roman imperial cult in Asia Minor, Les Prêtres des empereurs. Le culte impérial civique dans la province romaine d’Asie (Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2012).  It consists of an extensive database with thoroughly described personal entries, based on extensive epigraphic remains edited in various publications, accompanied by a bibliography.  The database can be browsed by city (which includes an interactive map); title of cultic office (in Greek and Latin); alphabetically by priests’ name; or by publication.  One can additionally search the personal entries by keyword.  This site is a wonderful research tool and represents a pioneering effort to make a corpus of prosopographic data on Late Antique religion available on the web.

http://www.pretres-civiques.org/