Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine

inscription 2 close-up small

The Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine (IIP) is a premier open-access epigraphic database directed by Professor Michael Satlow of Brown University, begun already in 1996.  The goal of the project is to digitize the approximately 15,000 published inscriptions from Israel/Palestine, over a broad temporal range, from the Persian Period to the Islamic Conquest (i.e. 500 BCE – 640 CE); approximately 1,500 inscriptions have already been entered.  What distinguishes this site from others of similar scope is the multiple languages included: Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin.  One can search the database in any of these languages, or their English translations (the project’s own); by content (e.g., “synagogue” or “church” for inscriptions in synagogues or churches); or by accompanying figures (e.g. cross).  Similarly, one can browse by place, date, inscription genre, physical medium, language (including multiple languages such as Aramaic and Greek), and, finally, religion (Jewish, Christian, Pagan, but currently no Samaritan).  This powerful tool allows for tracking various expressions (e.g., “one God”), and more generally, epigraphic practices, across the communities of Israel/Palestine.  In short, the site is a major resource for the study of the religions of Late Antiquity.

Digital Roman Forum in Late Antiquity

This ground-breaking project, undertaken between 1997 and 2005 at the UCLA Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory, under the direction of Bernard Frischer and Diane Favro, still remains the most important visual reference for the Roman Forum, a useful archive of literary and iconographic sources, and a standard for online visualization projects of ancient sites.  The Digital Roman Forum project aims to reconstruct the appearance of the Forum in Late Antiquity (400 CE), on a building-by-building basis.  The reconstruction of each monument is presented as a series of still images from various perspectives, as well as Panorma and Object movies; bibliographic information is included as well. Continue reading

Avesta.org

This extensive site devoted to Zoroastrianism includes conveniently organized translations of the Avesta and many of the later Pahlavi books, including the Dēnkard, an important doctrinal/apologetic compendium.  The translations are mostly by E.W. West, L.H. West, and James Darmesteter, from several volumes of Max Müller’s famous series Sacred Books of the East; the Pahlavi texts include translations from several other collections, including R.C. Zaehner’s The Teachings of the Magi (London, 1956). Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus: Text and Translation

Dr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B., of Saint Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo California, has made available online the text and translation of a number of important works by the fourth-century monastic theorist Evagrius Ponticus.  His site is noteworthy for providing translations of texts that are not available in English anywhere in print, most notably the Kephalaia Gnostica, a highly influential text for monastic spirituality, extant in Syriac, but not the original Greek. Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus

This site is maintained by Joel Kalvesmaki of Dumbarton Oaks; it includes a number of resources on the pivotal Egyptian monastic theorist Evagrius of Pontus.  The periodically updated bibliography now has 578 entries, which can be searched by keyword or sorted by year of publication, publication type, and author; online links are provided when available. Continue reading

Sasanika

An important and steadily expanding centralized information portal for all aspects of the history and culture of the Sasanian Empire, hosted at the University of California-Irvine, under the direction of Touraj Daryaee.  Some highlights of the site are the open-access series “e-sasanika,” including bibliographical studies, topical surveys, and catalogues of material culture; various primary sources in English translation; a working bibliography of Sasanian studies in the form of a searchable pdf; Continue reading