A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

This bibliographic database, compiled and hosted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity, covers scholarship in multiple languages from the 17th-century to 2012.  One can conveniently browse or search the database by author, year, era, or keyword (reflecting the generous tagging of each individual entry for content). Continue reading

Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus: Text and Translation

Dr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B., of Saint Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo California, has made available online the text and translation of a number of important works by the fourth-century monastic theorist Evagrius Ponticus.  His site is noteworthy for providing translations of texts that are not available in English anywhere in print, most notably the Kephalaia Gnostica, a highly influential text for monastic spirituality, extant in Syriac, but not the original Greek. Continue reading

The Egeria Project

This interesting site is sponsored by a variety of civic and religious institutions, as well as cultural agencies; the full name of the project is Egeria: Mediterranean Medieval Places of Pilgrimage.  According to the site, the goal of the project is “the establishment of a network of cooperation for the documentation, preservation, enhancement and promotion of pilgrimage monuments.” Continue reading

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

The Hill Museum and Manuscript Library (HMML) at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota is building an archive of reproductions of Eastern Christian manuscripts, especially those in danger of damage or destruction, under the direction of Professor Columba Stewart.  According to the website, there are now over 125,000 manuscripts on microfilm or digitized. Continue reading

Aramaico

A Portuguese language blog on Aramaic language and culture; includes a series of well-organized links to Syriac texts, which are arranged both according to ancient authors and modern series, namely CSCO  Scriptores Syri and Patrologia Orientalis, from either Google Books or the Internet Archive. Continue reading

Claremont Coptic Encyclopedia

The Claremont Coptic encyclopedia is an “updated and continuously expanding and evolving web-based version of the Coptic Encyclopedia,” an exemplary multi-volume work published in 1991 (editor: Aziz Atiya), significantly ahead of similar resources in Syriac and Ethiopic Christianity. Continue reading

Patrologia Latina Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Latina; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading

Patrologia Graeca Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Graeca; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading