Bumberazi by Stephen Rapp: Explorations in Medieval Georgia and Caucasia

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This site presents the research of Stephen Rapp, who has done much over the past several decades to present Late Antique and Medieval Georgia to an Anglophone audience.  It contains an important list of links to the Georgian text and/or English translations of key sources, including the Life of Nino and the Conversion of Kartli; links to relevant sites; as well as a gallery of photos taken by the author.  An important resource for an understudied area of Late Antiquity.

http://bumberazi.com/

Kartvelologists (or aspiring ones) may also consult other Old Georgian resources strewn across the web: hmmlorientalia has a great survey of basic grammatical resources, as well as a series of posts on Old Georgian; and a number of Old Georgian writings are available as e-texts on Titus.org.

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Apocryphicity by Tony Burke

This important blog on Christian apocrypha was established about six years ago by Tony Burke of York University.  The author posts updates and commentary on recent scholarship about apocryphal literature, as reflected in publications, conferences, and on the web.  Burke, along with Brent Laundau of the University of Oklahoma, is co-editing the two-volume More Christian Apocrypha (forthcoming with Eerdmans, beginning 2013); his site also contains a useful breakdown of many apocryphal texts that will appear in this work, almost all of them highly interesting, but with no English translation and limited bibliography, which is duly provided.

http://www.tonyburke.ca/apocryphicity/

A Bibliography on Christianity in Palestine/Eretz-Israel

This large bibliographical database covers all periods from the Roman Empire to the present.  Late Antiquity, with the development of the Christian Holy Land, is well represented.  Like the Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity, it is hosted at Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Early Christianity.  The bibliography can be browsed alphabetically by author, year, era (Roman Palestine, Byzantine Palestine, Islamic Period, Crusaders, Mamluk Period, Ottoman Period, and Modernity), or according to a very large number of keywords based on tags for each entry, a feature that offers significant searching power. Continue reading

TITUS/ARMAZI: Biblical, Apocryphal, and Patristic Texts in Old Georgian

The TITUS site, which is otherwise dedicated mostly to electronic Texts in Indo-European languages, also contains a very large group of texts in Old Georgian; most of these were entered in the framework of the Armazi project for the electronic documentation of Caucasian languages and cultures, an early internet endeavor conducted between 1999 and 2002.  Electronic texts include the complete Old and New Testaments, with entries for specific manuscripts and lectionaries; important apocryphal texts, such as the Story of Joseph of Arimathea on the first church in Lydda (for which see my article in Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 50); Continue reading