“The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife” and Codex Tchacos Fragments: Digital Images

The Coptic conference in Rome is off to a fast start!  Among the many interesting communications today at the Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum, two concerned fascinating and unpublished apocryphal texts (fragments, unfortunately), digital images of which have graciously been made available online before their print publication, allowing scholars and the interested public to study them immediately.  Professor Karen King of Harvard presented a tiny, poorly-written portion of a manuscript page, owned by a private collector, which features a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples in which he mentions “my wife.” Continue reading

Hmmlorientalia by Adam McCollum

This rich blog by Adam McCollum features posts connected to his work as lead cataloguer of Eastern Christian Manuscripts at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library at St. John’s University, Minnesota.  There are a number of interesting entries about manuscripts which he has examined, including observations about the field of Eastern Christian studies more generally (especially Armenian, Arabic, Ethiopic, and Syriac), which is literally centuries behind Classics with respect to cataloguing and editing. Continue reading

Syriac Studies Reference Library

The Syriac Studies Reference Library is a joint project of Brigham Young University and the Catholic University of America, through which a number of foundational scholarly works from the 18th to early 20th century have been scanned from CUA’s own collection and made available online; most are unavailable in Google Books or the Internet Archive.  One can browse by ancient authors, such as Nestorius, and topics, such as hagiography and historiography; or search by keyword.  Textual editions and translations, studies, and research tools are all well represented. Continue reading

Apocrypha/Ascetica/Magica/Manichaica at Heidelberg

The Heidelberger Papyrussammlung has made a number of color photos (in both 72 and 150 DPI) of very important Coptic papyri available on their website, including: the Acta Pauli, ed. Carl Schmidt (Hildesheim, 1905; P. Heid. Inv. Kopt. 300-301), important as a witness to both the text and the Lycopolitan dialect; selections of P. Nepheros, ed. Bärbel Kramer and John Shelton (Mainz, 1987; mostly Greek papyri), an important fourth-century monastic archive from the Heracleopolite nome; Continue reading

Coptica by Pierre Cherix

This is a premier site for Coptic studies, run by Pierre Cherix of the Université de Genève, containing both original research tools and an excellent selection of e-Books, presented for convenient browsing.  Among the former is his “Lexique copte (dialecte sahidique),” which is available for download as a searchable pdf, and lists Coptic words of Greek or Latin origin (noticeably lacking from Crum); I will include a discussion of another tool, his “Index grec-copte,” in a separate post on “Graeco-Coptica.” Continue reading

Photoshop Manual for Scholars

This site is part of the West Semitic Research Project at the University of Southern California, founded by Bruce and Kenneth Zuckerman, who are famous for their photography of ancient manuscripts, including the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Coptic Manichaean codices from Medinet Madi.  They have provided some basic guidance for scholars using Adobe Photoshop to work with digital images of ancient texts; Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Nag Hammadi Archive

This important collection of photos documents the editing of the Nag Hammadi Library and related activities, in Egypt, during the mid-70s.  They include photographs of the editors working at the Coptic Museum in Cairo; from the archaeological work done around the spot of the find; and finally, a series of negatives of the manuscripts themselves, taken in 1973, distinct from the facsimile edition of the codices later published by Brill. Continue reading

Dukhrana

Dukhrana (Syriac for “remembrance”) is a blog devoted to Syriac studies, especially the Peshitta, administered by Lars Lindgren, and making use of George Kiraz’s Syriac Electronic Data Retrieval Archive (SEDRA).  In addition to digital images of several manuscripts, the entire Peshitta is available as an electronic text, which can be browsed by chapter, with the options of displaying English translations of the Peshitta, as well as Greek and Latin biblical texts, simultaneously. Continue reading

Index of Armenian Art

A very important resource for Armenian art, maintained by the Armenian Studies program at California State University Fresno, including an index of Armenian architecture (mostly ecclesiastical), and an index of illuminations in medieval Armenian manuscripts.  The first index features a list of churches by architectural type, for each of which there is an extensive description, usually including a floor plan, picture, and sometimes even a video.  Major Late Antique foundations such as Etchmiadzin figure prominently. Continue reading