Epigraphic Database Bari (EDB)

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This database of early Christian inscriptions from Rome and its “suburbs,” from the 3rd to the 8th century, is a founding member of EAGLE, the (eventually) comprehensive European Archive of Greek and Latin Epigraphy. Most inscriptions in the project, which is ongoing with 33,162 currently online, were first published in the venerable Inscriptiones Christianes Urbis Romanae, NS vols. I-X. As is customary for digital epigraphy projects, the entry for each inscription includes a bibliography, as well as other helpful, standardized metadata, such as context (if known), material, and iconographic features (also a feature of the Inscriptions of Israel Palestine). This supplementary information will enable strategies of data analysis which are not possible for electronic corpora of literary texts. Somewhat exceptionally, a digital image of the original is included for most entries, which can be difficult for epigraphic databases because of copyright, loss, or destruction; these images are available by an agreement with the Papal Commission of Sacred Archaeology. Finally, revisions of some inscriptions are planned, part of a trend which will eventually make digital (rather than print) publication the standard source for epigraphic data.

http://www.edb.uniba.it/

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The Online Critical Pseudepigrapha

This site, edited by Ian Scott of Tyndale Seminary, contains online editions of many Old Testament Pseudepigrapha in various ancient and medieval languages, though the basis for most is Greek, with Latin also well represented. The Introductions to each text are original and helpful, including a description of the manuscript evidence across multiple versions, and an annotated bibliography of print editions designating manuscripts used, which can also be browsed by author or keyword and searched. The currently available electronic texts are often a transcription of an out-of-copyright edition, and sometimes include evidence from multiple manuscripts; eclectic texts taking into account extant versions in Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Ethiopic, and other languages are planned.

While the Online Critical Pseudepigrapha is still very much a work in progress, it is laudable for its efforts to make widely available the electronic text of these important documents, and thus multiplying possibilities for research. The full texts of widely cited works such as the Lives of Adam and Eve and the Testament of Abraham, which are not yet in Perseus or other open access digital library, can now be employed in DH research, for example corpus analysis with the statistics program R; copyright information varies by text, and a full statement is given here: http://ocp.tyndale.ca/copyright-and-permissions

The Ammianus Marcellinus Online Project

The Ammianus Marcellinus Online Project, led by Jan Willem Drijvers at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, is a developing resource on this central historian of Late Antiquity, whose virtues are extolled by authors both ancient and modern.  It includes an introductory biography and bibliography on general works, as well as a list of editions, translations, commentaries, and concordances.  The schematic representation of the structure of the Res Gestae, based partially on T.D. Barnes work in Ammianus Marcellinus and the Representation of Historical Reality (1988) is also helpful for presenting overviews in, say, graduate seminars or for assessing the scope of the extant work.  Finally, there is a collection of original short essays by various contributors.  This will be an important site of basic reference, and a useful complement to the ongoing “Dutch commentary” on Ammianus, in which Drijvers is involved.

http://odur.let.rug.nl/~drijvers/ammianus/index.htm

Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine

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The Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine (IIP) is a premier open-access epigraphic database directed by Professor Michael Satlow of Brown University, begun already in 1996.  The goal of the project is to digitize the approximately 15,000 published inscriptions from Israel/Palestine, over a broad temporal range, from the Persian Period to the Islamic Conquest (i.e. 500 BCE – 640 CE); approximately 1,500 inscriptions have already been entered.  What distinguishes this site from others of similar scope is the multiple languages included: Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin.  One can search the database in any of these languages, or their English translations (the project’s own); by content (e.g., “synagogue” or “church” for inscriptions in synagogues or churches); or by accompanying figures (e.g. cross).  Similarly, one can browse by place, date, inscription genre, physical medium, language (including multiple languages such as Aramaic and Greek), and, finally, religion (Jewish, Christian, Pagan, but currently no Samaritan).  This powerful tool allows for tracking various expressions (e.g., “one God”), and more generally, epigraphic practices, across the communities of Israel/Palestine.  In short, the site is a major resource for the study of the religions of Late Antiquity.

The Life of Martin on Dickinson College Commentaries

Dickinson College Commentaries, created by Professor Chris Francese with a grant from the Roberts Fund for Classical Studies, currently consists of electronic editions of Julius Caesar’s Gallic War, Sulpicius Severus’s Life of Martin, and Ovid’s Amores Book 1. The texts are a combination of previous editions and do not reflect additional manuscript work; rather, the focus is pedagogical, as I can attest from my own use of the site in a Late-Antique Latin seminar I offered this spring.  Audio files of the entire text are available for download, and words not in the site’s core vocabulary lists of Greek or Latin (themselves invaluable resources) are glossed; a substantial number of grammatical notes are also provided by Francese.  Dickinson College Commentaries is now accepting submissions for electronic editions of additional Latin texts, to be reviewed by the editorial committee, and thus represents a unique, valuable opportunity for publishing digital editions of Greek and Latin texts to be used especially in the classroom.

 

 

The Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database

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This database of magical gems, named after Campbell-Bonner’s famous collection of 1954, is in fact far more extensive, containing over 1,000 items.  These are drawn from over 30 collections, including the British Museum, and the Budapest Museum of Fine Arts, which is curating the website with the University of Fribourg, under the direction of an international editorial board.  According to the site, the database, which is currently expanding, contains “a fourth of the known corpus of magical gems.”  Its search functions allow the user to browse the gems by collection, material, place of discovery (only a few of which are known), iconographical schemes and elements, vocabulary (gem inscriptions in Greek and Latin), names, voces magicae, Logoi, and Characteres.  The entries themselves contain this information, when available, along with digital images of the gems; these can even be sent as electronic postcards!  There is a small glossary and bibliography, which has the helpful feature of noting the gems referred to in each entry.  Clearly this is a major resource, which will become even more important as the site grows.

http://www2.szepmuveszeti.hu/talismans/

 

Die Griechischen Christlichen Schriftsteller and Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum Online

Significant portions of two magisterial series of critical editions for Christian texts from Late Antiquity can be easily downloaded from enumerated lists linked to archive.org and Google Books: Die Griechischen Christlichen Schriftsteller (GCS), available at Roger Pearse and Patrologia Latina, Graeca, & Orientalis (PLGO; through Scribd); and Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL), also available at Roger Pearse and the PLGO.  While all of the texts from the series Sources Chrétiennes, founded in 1942, are still under copyright, useful information on the many volumes can be found on the Institute’s website.  Similarly, Brepols Corpus Christianorum, and its various subseries, are under copyright; the Series Latina is available by subscription in the Library of Latin Texts.