Apocryphicity by Tony Burke

This important blog on Christian apocrypha was established about six years ago by Tony Burke of York University.  The author posts updates and commentary on recent scholarship about apocryphal literature, as reflected in publications, conferences, and on the web.  Burke, along with Brent Laundau of the University of Oklahoma, is co-editing the two-volume More Christian Apocrypha (forthcoming with Eerdmans, beginning 2013); his site also contains a useful breakdown of many apocryphal texts that will appear in this work, almost all of them highly interesting, but with no English translation and limited bibliography, which is duly provided.

http://www.tonyburke.ca/apocryphicity/

Online Glossarium Graeco-Arabicum

This website represents an extraordinary marriage between the note card – a standard form of data entry before computer-assisted research – and the internet database, in the service of an immense scholarly reference work with has been diligently assembled over several decades but relatively slow to appear in print.  The project in question is the Glossarium Graeco-Arabicum, based at the Ruhr Universität Bochum since 1980, and with the initial collaboration of Yale University. Continue reading

Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

Neoplatonic Bibliographies: Proclus and Damascius

This site, administered by Gerd van Riel at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, is an evolving bibliography, last updated in 2012.  Two separate pages are devoted to the major late Neoplatonists, Proclus and Damascius. Continue reading

Last Statues of Antiquity Database

This recently activated site is described as “a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.”  The project is directed by R.R.R. Smith and Bryan Ward-Perkins at Oxford University, where the site is hosted; the database was produced by a large international team of contributors, with funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council. Continue reading

Bibliotheca Augustana

Administered by the Hochschule Augsburg, this online library contains e-texts in multiple languages, with an entirely Latin interface (caveat lector!).  There are numerous writings in both the Bibliotheca Latina and the Bibliotheca Graeca, including from Late Antiquity, where both Christian and non-Christian authors are well represented.  Most patristic texts are reproduced from critical editions subsequent to Migne (apparatus not included, of course); images of authors are sometimes included, as well as basic introductions (again, in Latin!).  Continue reading

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity

This site, from the (relatively) early days of the web, is the result of an exhibit at the Kelsey Museum of the University of Michigan, curated in 1996 by Gideon Bohak, who has recently published Ancient Jewish Magic: A History (Cambridge, 2008).  Included are “Recipe books,” papyri with instructions for assembling various ingredients as part of the spell; a particularly rich collection of papyri amulets and gems, mostly from Campbell Bonner’s Studies in Magical Amulets: Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian (Ann Arbor, 1950), including the famous cock-headed anguiped “IAO;” Continue reading

Pyle: Gateway to Greek Manuscripts

This is an essential website for the study of Greek manuscripts from the Byzantine period, administered by Pasquale Orsini of the Università di Catania-Siracusa.  Its resources include information on manuscript catalogues, with some print catalogues available for download as pdfs; bibliography on paleography and codicology, with links to books available online; Continue reading

Evagrius Ponticus: Text and Translation

Dr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B., of Saint Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo California, has made available online the text and translation of a number of important works by the fourth-century monastic theorist Evagrius Ponticus.  His site is noteworthy for providing translations of texts that are not available in English anywhere in print, most notably the Kephalaia Gnostica, a highly influential text for monastic spirituality, extant in Syriac, but not the original Greek. Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading