Ancient Iran: Courses and Grammars by Prods Oktor Skjærvø

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Prods Oktor Skjærvø, the Agha Khan Professor of Iranian Studies at Harvard University, has published online an impressive series of courses and grammars on ancient Iran (and Central Asia), from the Avestan period to the Middle Ages. Continue reading

Syriac Studies Reference Library

The Syriac Studies Reference Library is a joint project of Brigham Young University and the Catholic University of America, through which a number of foundational scholarly works from the 18th to early 20th century have been scanned from CUA’s own collection and made available online; most are unavailable in Google Books or the Internet Archive.  One can browse by ancient authors, such as Nestorius, and topics, such as hagiography and historiography; or search by keyword.  Textual editions and translations, studies, and research tools are all well represented. Continue reading

Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

e-COPTOLOGY: Towards a Digital Heritage

This blog, recently launched by Ibrahim Saweros of Leiden University, provides a series of links to works in Coptic studies of the most varied character.  For the most part, they are scanned by the author, and made available for download from mediafire.com.  Saweros focuses on texts absent from the sites of Pierre Cherix and Alin Suciu, to which it is an important complement. Continue reading

Apocrypha/Ascetica/Magica/Manichaica at Heidelberg

The Heidelberger Papyrussammlung has made a number of color photos (in both 72 and 150 DPI) of very important Coptic papyri available on their website, including: the Acta Pauli, ed. Carl Schmidt (Hildesheim, 1905; P. Heid. Inv. Kopt. 300-301), important as a witness to both the text and the Lycopolitan dialect; selections of P. Nepheros, ed. Bärbel Kramer and John Shelton (Mainz, 1987; mostly Greek papyri), an important fourth-century monastic archive from the Heracleopolite nome; Continue reading

Coptica by Pierre Cherix

This is a premier site for Coptic studies, run by Pierre Cherix of the Université de Genève, containing both original research tools and an excellent selection of e-Books, presented for convenient browsing.  Among the former is his “Lexique copte (dialecte sahidique),” which is available for download as a searchable pdf, and lists Coptic words of Greek or Latin origin (noticeably lacking from Crum); I will include a discussion of another tool, his “Index grec-copte,” in a separate post on “Graeco-Coptica.” Continue reading

A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

This bibliographic database, compiled and hosted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity, covers scholarship in multiple languages from the 17th-century to 2012.  One can conveniently browse or search the database by author, year, era, or keyword (reflecting the generous tagging of each individual entry for content). Continue reading