Graeco-Coptica

A large percentage of Coptic literature consists of translations from the Greek, beginning with the Septuagint and the New Testament, and continuing through “gnostic,” apocryphal, and patristic texts.  Walter Ewing Crum’s A Coptic Dictionary (Oxford, 1939), a major accomplishment in the field, reflects this connection by listing Greek equivalents for Coptic words in biblical and patristic texts (though not exhaustively; see “Preface,” viii).  However, Crum did not include Greek loan words in the dictionary, which are numerous. Continue reading

Last Statues of Antiquity Database

This recently activated site is described as “a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.”  The project is directed by R.R.R. Smith and Bryan Ward-Perkins at Oxford University, where the site is hosted; the database was produced by a large international team of contributors, with funding from the Arts & Humanities Research Council. Continue reading

Photoshop Manual for Scholars

This site is part of the West Semitic Research Project at the University of Southern California, founded by Bruce and Kenneth Zuckerman, who are famous for their photography of ancient manuscripts, including the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Coptic Manichaean codices from Medinet Madi.  They have provided some basic guidance for scholars using Adobe Photoshop to work with digital images of ancient texts; Continue reading

“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DMNT)

This site is a database of published documents (currently comprising 733 texts) from Medieval Nubia that use any form of chronological system; it is administered at the University of Warsaw by Grzegorz Ochała, who used this data in his recently published book Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia (Warsaw, 2011).  The texts are in the three primary written languages of medieval Nubia: Greek, Coptic, and Old Nubian. Continue reading

Medieval Nubia

A central resource for the developing field of Old Nubian studies, administered by Giovanni Ruffini of Fairfield University.  A highlight of the site is the series of important overview articles by William Adams, who has over forty years of experience as an excavator of medieval Nubian sites. Continue reading