“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DMNT)

This site is a database of published documents (currently comprising 733 texts) from Medieval Nubia that use any form of chronological system; it is administered at the University of Warsaw by Grzegorz Ochała, who used this data in his recently published book Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia (Warsaw, 2011).  The texts are in the three primary written languages of medieval Nubia: Greek, Coptic, and Old Nubian. Continue reading

Thesaurus Linguae Aethiopicae

This site, run by Manfred Kropp of the University of Mainz, contains resources on computing and Ethiopian languages, in particular Ge’ez and Amharic.  Resources include documents on transliteration standards; unfortunately, the link to fonts is broken.  The ultimate goal of the project is to create an electronic database of texts in Ethiopian languages, including the Axumite inscriptions, of particular interest for Late Antique religions. Continue reading

Patrologia Latina Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Latina; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading

Patrologia Graeca Online

This site provides links to Google Books or the Internet Archive for each volume of the series Patrologia Graeca; it is also possible to download a searchable pdf.  While not as powerful a research tool as the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, it is open access, and allows for a fast and convenient method of tracking down references to Migne. Continue reading

Medieval Nubia

A central resource for the developing field of Old Nubian studies, administered by Giovanni Ruffini of Fairfield University.  A highlight of the site is the series of important overview articles by William Adams, who has over forty years of experience as an excavator of medieval Nubian sites. Continue reading