Visualizing Statues in Late Antiquity

This fascinating and innovative project seeks to give users the experience of how statues (and their inscribed bases) constituted a collective memory among those who participated in the ritual space of the Late-Antique Roman Forum.  The PI of “Visualizing Statues” is Diana Favro of UCLA, with Chris Johanson as CI and Gregor Kalas as Fellow; it was developed in UCLA’s Experiental Technologies Center, with the support of the NEH.  The site is a model for a smooth interface between 3-d visualization of ancient monuments in their spatial context; 2-d plans of urban spaces; material culture, including statues bases with inscriptions; a timeline, between 284 and 526 CE; and even literary sources, namely Claudian’s portrait of the emperor Honorius’s Consular Procession in 404 CE, a compelling description of Late-Antique imperial ceremony used as a textual basis for framing the experience of the online audience. Continue reading

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Library of Late Antique Latin Texts: Biblioteca digitale di testi latini tardoantichi (digilibLT)

This extraordinary resource, headed by Raffaella Tabacco and Maurizio Lana of the Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, seeks to make available all literary Latin texts from Late Antiquity (ranging from the second to seventh centuries CE); as well as to establish a Canon of authors and acephalous works, with short descriptions and associated bibliography.  One can browse by date or name of author and work, and download the Latin text (all taken from critical editions) in either .txt format or marked up in TEI XML.  A relatively small percentage of the Canon is currently available, but there are regular updates, with an initial focus on pagan prose authors. Continue reading