Islamic Stories and Tombs of Biblical Prophets

The personal website of Brannon Wheeler includes a number of interesting resources for early and medieval Islam.  There is a collection of pages on the biblical prophets, with a resume of Islamic traditions concerning them, abridged from his study of the Qisas al-anbiya, Prophets in the Quran: An Introduction to the Quran and Muslim Exegesis (Continuum, 2002).  Manuscript illuminations are provided for each prophet, though they are not cited – my guess is that they are Persian and Ottoman.  An additional section contains pages on the tombs and shrines of prophets, accompanied by photographs of the contemporary site.  There is a growing field (though one with an extended and highly contested pedigree) on interconnections between early Islamic, Jewish, and Christian tradition, as evidenced, for example, by the recently announced Society for Qur’anic Studies, the organization of which is to be coordinated initially by the SBL. Continue reading

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TITUS/ARMAZI: Biblical, Apocryphal, and Patristic Texts in Old Georgian

The TITUS site, which is otherwise dedicated mostly to electronic Texts in Indo-European languages, also contains a very large group of texts in Old Georgian; most of these were entered in the framework of the Armazi project for the electronic documentation of Caucasian languages and cultures, an early internet endeavor conducted between 1999 and 2002.  Electronic texts include the complete Old and New Testaments, with entries for specific manuscripts and lectionaries; important apocryphal texts, such as the Story of Joseph of Arimathea on the first church in Lydda (for which see my article in Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 50); Continue reading

Apocrypha/Ascetica/Magica/Manichaica at Heidelberg

The Heidelberger Papyrussammlung has made a number of color photos (in both 72 and 150 DPI) of very important Coptic papyri available on their website, including: the Acta Pauli, ed. Carl Schmidt (Hildesheim, 1905; P. Heid. Inv. Kopt. 300-301), important as a witness to both the text and the Lycopolitan dialect; selections of P. Nepheros, ed. Bärbel Kramer and John Shelton (Mainz, 1987; mostly Greek papyri), an important fourth-century monastic archive from the Heracleopolite nome; Continue reading

Coptica by Pierre Cherix

This is a premier site for Coptic studies, run by Pierre Cherix of the Université de Genève, containing both original research tools and an excellent selection of e-Books, presented for convenient browsing.  Among the former is his “Lexique copte (dialecte sahidique),” which is available for download as a searchable pdf, and lists Coptic words of Greek or Latin origin (noticeably lacking from Crum); I will include a discussion of another tool, his “Index grec-copte,” in a separate post on “Graeco-Coptica.” Continue reading

A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

This bibliographic database, compiled and hosted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for the Study of Christianity, covers scholarship in multiple languages from the 17th-century to 2012.  One can conveniently browse or search the database by author, year, era, or keyword (reflecting the generous tagging of each individual entry for content). Continue reading

Claremont Coptic Encyclopedia

The Claremont Coptic encyclopedia is an “updated and continuously expanding and evolving web-based version of the Coptic Encyclopedia,” an exemplary multi-volume work published in 1991 (editor: Aziz Atiya), significantly ahead of similar resources in Syriac and Ethiopic Christianity. Continue reading

Alin Suciu on Coptic Literature and Codicology

This extraordinary site includes updates on Alin Suciu’s manuscript studies, mostly of homiletic, apocryphal, and ascetic literature; occasional guest posts by other scholars on their ongoing research; and an excellent collection of out-of-copyright Coptic editions and monographs. Continue reading