Vetus Latina: Online Resources

This site offers basic information on the Old Latin (Vetus Latina) versions of the bible, which remain comparatively intractable and overlooked in research on the history of the biblical text and of early Christianity.  Last updated in 2008, it nevertheless contains some useful information, including a book-by-book list of the available editions, an ongoing project of the Institut Vetus Latina in Beuron, published by Herder Press.  Also useful is the explanation of the numbering system for Old Latin manuscripts, which includes a few stray images.  To my knowledge, the only fully digitized Old Latin manuscript is Codex Bezae at Cambridge; some important codices, such as Codex Veronensis (4), are partly photographed as part of the Verbum Project, which I will review shortly.  The extensive note cards of patristic citations, held at the Institut Vetus Latina, have been digitized and are available for a subscription fee from Brepols, but even this resource can be difficult to navigate.

http://www.vetuslatina.org/

International Qur’anic Studies Association: A Blog

The International Qur’anic Studies Association was founded in 2012 as a three-year consultation within the Society of Biblical Literature, after which it will become an independent, international scholarly organization devoted to the study of the Qur’ān from a variety of perspectives: “it seeks to involve specialists in literature, history, archaeology, paleography, and religious studies.”  Biblical studies and Late Antiquity will surely be well represented.  As part of its effort to connect with the public, there is already a lively website, including a (short) list of resources, and a promising blog with posts on diverse topics, such as whether or not to translate John Wansbrough’s Qur’anic Studies and the Sectarian Milieu “into English” (!), by the founding directors Emran El-Badawi of the University of Houston and Gabriel Reynolds of Notre Dame, and others.  There is also a list of resources, which the viewer can supplement with the rapidly growing website of Mehdi Azaiez, a postdoctoral fellow at Notre Dame: Coran et sciences de l’Homme: histoire, language, lectures.