The Egeria Project

This interesting site is sponsored by a variety of civic and religious institutions, as well as cultural agencies; the full name of the project is Egeria: Mediterranean Medieval Places of Pilgrimage.  According to the site, the goal of the project is “the establishment of a network of cooperation for the documentation, preservation, enhancement and promotion of pilgrimage monuments.” Continue reading

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“Rome Wasn’t Digitized in a Day”

This open-access book by Alison Babeu, Digital Librarian and research coordinator of the venerable Perseus Project, is available for download as a searchable pdf from the website of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). Continue reading

Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DMNT)

This site is a database of published documents (currently comprising 733 texts) from Medieval Nubia that use any form of chronological system; it is administered at the University of Warsaw by Grzegorz Ochała, who used this data in his recently published book Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia (Warsaw, 2011).  The texts are in the three primary written languages of medieval Nubia: Greek, Coptic, and Old Nubian. Continue reading

Nag Hammadi Archive

This important collection of photos documents the editing of the Nag Hammadi Library and related activities, in Egypt, during the mid-70s.  They include photographs of the editors working at the Coptic Museum in Cairo; from the archaeological work done around the spot of the find; and finally, a series of negatives of the manuscripts themselves, taken in 1973, distinct from the facsimile edition of the codices later published by Brill. Continue reading

Dukhrana

Dukhrana (Syriac for “remembrance”) is a blog devoted to Syriac studies, especially the Peshitta, administered by Lars Lindgren, and making use of George Kiraz’s Syriac Electronic Data Retrieval Archive (SEDRA).  In addition to digital images of several manuscripts, the entire Peshitta is available as an electronic text, which can be browsed by chapter, with the options of displaying English translations of the Peshitta, as well as Greek and Latin biblical texts, simultaneously. Continue reading

Coptic Churches and Monasteries

One of a growing number of websites geared towards tourism but presenting useful overviews for students of religion in Late Antiquity.  It includes a reasonably accurate description of numerous historic Coptic churches, organized by region, with photographs, historical notes, and, occasionally, floor plans.  There is also a section on the Christian monasteries of Egypt.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/coptchurch.htm

Banque de données des textes coptes documentaires

This site is a comprehensive, periodically updated database of Coptic documentary texts, administered by Alain Delattre of the Université Libre de Bruxelles.  Although users cannot browse it, there are a number of useful search options, including sigla (i.e., abbreviation for the collection in which it is published), inventory number (of the collection in which the text is located); material; dialect; origin; date; and a variety of content tags in French.  This data, when it exists, has been entered for each published papyrus; the Coptic text is not yet available. Continue reading