Nag Hammadi Archive

This important collection of photos documents the editing of the Nag Hammadi Library and related activities, in Egypt, during the mid-70s.  They include photographs of the editors working at the Coptic Museum in Cairo; from the archaeological work done around the spot of the find; and finally, a series of negatives of the manuscripts themselves, taken in 1973, distinct from the facsimile edition of the codices later published by Brill. Continue reading

Dukhrana

Dukhrana (Syriac for “remembrance”) is a blog devoted to Syriac studies, especially the Peshitta, administered by Lars Lindgren, and making use of George Kiraz’s Syriac Electronic Data Retrieval Archive (SEDRA).  In addition to digital images of several manuscripts, the entire Peshitta is available as an electronic text, which can be browsed by chapter, with the options of displaying English translations of the Peshitta, as well as Greek and Latin biblical texts, simultaneously. Continue reading

Coptic Churches and Monasteries

One of a growing number of websites geared towards tourism but presenting useful overviews for students of religion in Late Antiquity.  It includes a reasonably accurate description of numerous historic Coptic churches, organized by region, with photographs, historical notes, and, occasionally, floor plans.  There is also a section on the Christian monasteries of Egypt.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/coptchurch.htm

Banque de données des textes coptes documentaires

This site is a comprehensive, periodically updated database of Coptic documentary texts, administered by Alain Delattre of the Université Libre de Bruxelles.  Although users cannot browse it, there are a number of useful search options, including sigla (i.e., abbreviation for the collection in which it is published), inventory number (of the collection in which the text is located); material; dialect; origin; date; and a variety of content tags in French.  This data, when it exists, has been entered for each published papyrus; the Coptic text is not yet available. Continue reading

Encyclopaedia Aethiopica

This site is associated with the Encyclopaedia Aethiopica, a massive reference work of Ethiopian history from the pre-Christian to the modern periods, of which four (of five) volumes have already been published.  Although the site contains no research tools as such, there are useful items such as a list of articles in the EAE, and, most notably, a bibliography of standard monographs, travel narratives, reference works, and journals on the history, culture, and languages of Ethiopia.

http://www1.uni-hamburg.de/EAE/

Index of Armenian Art

A very important resource for Armenian art, maintained by the Armenian Studies program at California State University Fresno, including an index of Armenian architecture (mostly ecclesiastical), and an index of illuminations in medieval Armenian manuscripts.  The first index features a list of churches by architectural type, for each of which there is an extensive description, usually including a floor plan, picture, and sometimes even a video.  Major Late Antique foundations such as Etchmiadzin figure prominently. Continue reading

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

The Hill Museum and Manuscript Library (HMML) at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota is building an archive of reproductions of Eastern Christian manuscripts, especially those in danger of damage or destruction, under the direction of Professor Columba Stewart.  According to the website, there are now over 125,000 manuscripts on microfilm or digitized. Continue reading

Thesaurus Linguae Aethiopicae

This site, run by Manfred Kropp of the University of Mainz, contains resources on computing and Ethiopian languages, in particular Ge’ez and Amharic.  Resources include documents on transliteration standards; unfortunately, the link to fonts is broken.  The ultimate goal of the project is to create an electronic database of texts in Ethiopian languages, including the Axumite inscriptions, of particular interest for Late Antique religions. Continue reading

Aramaico

A Portuguese language blog on Aramaic language and culture; includes a series of well-organized links to Syriac texts, which are arranged both according to ancient authors and modern series, namely CSCO  Scriptores Syri and Patrologia Orientalis, from either Google Books or the Internet Archive. Continue reading

Claremont Coptic Encyclopedia

The Claremont Coptic encyclopedia is an “updated and continuously expanding and evolving web-based version of the Coptic Encyclopedia,” an exemplary multi-volume work published in 1991 (editor: Aziz Atiya), significantly ahead of similar resources in Syriac and Ethiopic Christianity. Continue reading